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How and where to get your ENG1 Seafarer Medical Certificate

Written by Nathan Bees

Last updated: 20/04/2018

If you’re planning to get a job as crew on board a yacht, you’ll need to obtain an ENG1 Seafarer Medical Certificate or equivalent before you can begin working on board. Here’s a look into what the ENG1 is, why you need it and how you can set about obtaining yours.

Yacht doctor taking ENG1 crew examination notes

What is an ENG1 Seafarer Medical Certificate?

The ENG1 is a medical examination set by the MCA (Maritime and Coastguard Agency) to assess whether individuals are fit to work on a seagoing vessel and perform duties at sea. You’ll need an ENG1 if you’re in charge of a ship (a captain), serving on a merchant ship, or a seafarer. You’ll also need an ENG1 for any UK Certificate of Competency (CoC).

The MLC (Maritime Labour Convention) states that every seafarer must have a valid medical certificate recognised by the administration before they can start work at sea – the ENG1 certificate being the one you need in order to work on a yacht or ship.

[Note: To become a crewmember on board a domestic passenger ship that goes to sea, you’ll need an ML5 medical certificate.]

The ENG1 certificate is awarded upon completion of a basic medical examination, carried out by an MCA Approved Doctor (AD). If you’re over 18, pass the examination and are considered to be in good health, your ENG1 certificate can be valid for up to two years (your doctor will clarify terms upon completion).

Why do I need an ENG1 Certificate?

The purpose of the ENG1 examination is to establish whether you have any medical conditions that might cause you to be unable to perform your duties on board. It ensures that you’re suitably fit and don’t suffer from any medical condition that could be aggravated by time at sea, or endanger the health and safety of those around you.

Insurance companies require yachts to comply with safe-manning requirements in order for the yacht to be covered. This means that all crew must be fully STCW (Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers) compliant – and to obtain an STCW Basic Safety Certificate you need to have passed an ENG1 medical exam first.

Simply put, you’ll need to have passed your ENG1 at some stage to be able to work on a yacht, or gain any UK CoC. Some countries have their own equivalent seafarer medical certificates, with many of them accepted by the MCA for positions on board a yacht. A comprehensive list of the accepted certificates can be found here, on the MCA website.

When should I get my ENG1 examination?

Seeing as you need an ENG1 certificate before you can start working on a yacht, it’s a good idea to undertake the medical examination as soon as you make moves to embark on a career as a member of crew. It will then need to be renewed every two years.

Not only can the ENG1 be a prerequisite of any STCW mandatory training course, but it’s also beneficial for you to find out as early as possible if there are any medical reasons that will prevent you from working in the yachting industry, or restrict which roles you can perform aboard.

Doctor taking blood pressure

Where can I get an ENG1 medical exam?

Only MCA-approved doctors can perform an ENG1 medical exam, so it’s not always as straightforward as visiting your local GP. Fortunately there are numerous MCA-approved doctors around the UK that can carry out your ENG1 medical. You can also find a handful of approved doctors in most of the countries you would likely be looking to seek crew work (France, Spain, USA, etc.), giving you greater choice and flexibility.

The maximum fee for an ENG1 medical examination is £80 (approx. €90 or US$110). If you’re employed in the UK, your employer will pay this. If you need extra tests, you may be charged more. This must be agreed with whomever is paying for the ENG1 before you have the tests.

What to take to an ENG1 examination

Once you’ve booked an ENG1 medical examination with a certified doctor you may wonder if you need to take anything with you. The list includes:

  • A form of photo ID (passport, driving licence, official student pass [for new entrants], or a discharge book)
  • Your current ENG1 (if applicable)
  • The name, address and contact details of your GP
  • Any correspondence from your GP, if you’ve recently been to hospital
  • A list of any medication(s) you are taking
  • Your glasses/contact lenses (if you wear them)

What does an ENG1 examination entail?

As nerve-racking as the prospect of a medical examination is, don’t worry. An ENG1 examination is painless, non-invasive and carried out with minimal fuss by a medical professional.

A standard ENG1 examination will include:

  • Measuring your height and weight
  • A standard eye test
  • A colour blindness test
  • A hearing test
  • Ear and throat evaluations
  • Teeth/gums inspection
  • Questions on your medical history, drinking habits, etc.
  • A urine sample (to test kidney functionality and blood sugar)
  • Reflex testing
  • Listening to your heart and lungs, testing blood pressure and heart rate
  • Hernia testing (asking you to cough while gently pressing your abdomen)

The speed of the exam can depend on the doctor and location, but everything should be done and dusted within 30 to 40 minutes. If you pass, you should be issued with your ENG1 certificate straight away so you can be on your way!

Doctor shaking patient's hand

ENG1 results: What if I fail the ENG1 examination?

There are three possible outcomes for the ENG1 seafarer medical examination:

  1. Fit without restrictions (unrestricted)
  2. Fit with restrictions, limiting your work to certain jobs or locations
  3. Temporarily or permanently unfit

You may be awarded a ‘temporarily unfit certificate’ if the doctor has any concerns about your fitness and needs to gain additional medical information from your doctor, or advice from an MCA chief medical advisor.

If you are found ‘permanently unfit’ for the ENG1, this result stands for at least five years. You’ll need to show clinical evidence proving the condition that caused this result has been reversed to be able to progress in your application. You will receive an ENG3 Notice of Failure/Restriction if you’re found unfit or your ENG1 is restricted.

If you want to have an independent medical review, you must contact the MCA Seafarer Health and Safety Branch within one month of the ENG3 being issued. You can find a list of MCA medical referees here

If you’ve failed based on the Ishihara Plate Screening which tests colour vision, you'll be able to undertake the Colour Assessment Diagnosis (CAD) test, which measures the severity and type of colour-vision loss and congenital deficiency, costing between £100 and £150. If this is failed, a restricted ENG1 may be issued. However, deck officers who have failed the Ishihara and CAD tests will be classed as ENG3 Cat 4 ‘Permanently Unfit’.


What next?

Once you've been awarded your certificate, you can proceed with your journey to launch a career as yacht crew!

Here are a few articles you may find helpful in getting on board:

Good luck!

S.O.S Medical Group Ltd

A guide on how and where to get your ENG1 medical certificate

How and Where To get an ENG1 Seafarer Medical Certificate | Yachting Pages
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How and where to get your ENG1 Seafarer Medical Certificate

Written by Nathan Bees

Last updated: 20/04/2018

If you’re planning to get a job as crew on board a yacht, you’ll need to obtain an ENG1 Seafarer Medical Certificate or equivalent before you can begin working on board. Here’s a look into what the ENG1 is, why you need it and how you can set about obtaining yours.

Yacht doctor taking ENG1 crew examination notes

What is an ENG1 Seafarer Medical Certificate?

The ENG1 is a medical examination set by the MCA (Maritime and Coastguard Agency) to assess whether individuals are fit to work on a seagoing vessel and perform duties at sea. You’ll need an ENG1 if you’re in charge of a ship (a captain), serving on a merchant ship, or a seafarer. You’ll also need an ENG1 for any UK Certificate of Competency (CoC).

The MLC (Maritime Labour Convention) states that every seafarer must have a valid medical certificate recognised by the administration before they can start work at sea – the ENG1 certificate being the one you need in order to work on a yacht or ship.

[Note: To become a crewmember on board a domestic passenger ship that goes to sea, you’ll need an ML5 medical certificate.]

The ENG1 certificate is awarded upon completion of a basic medical examination, carried out by an MCA Approved Doctor (AD). If you’re over 18, pass the examination and are considered to be in good health, your ENG1 certificate can be valid for up to two years (your doctor will clarify terms upon completion).

Why do I need an ENG1 Certificate?

The purpose of the ENG1 examination is to establish whether you have any medical conditions that might cause you to be unable to perform your duties on board. It ensures that you’re suitably fit and don’t suffer from any medical condition that could be aggravated by time at sea, or endanger the health and safety of those around you.

Insurance companies require yachts to comply with safe-manning requirements in order for the yacht to be covered. This means that all crew must be fully STCW (Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers) compliant – and to obtain an STCW Basic Safety Certificate you need to have passed an ENG1 medical exam first.

Simply put, you’ll need to have passed your ENG1 at some stage to be able to work on a yacht, or gain any UK CoC. Some countries have their own equivalent seafarer medical certificates, with many of them accepted by the MCA for positions on board a yacht. A comprehensive list of the accepted certificates can be found here, on the MCA website.

When should I get my ENG1 examination?

Seeing as you need an ENG1 certificate before you can start working on a yacht, it’s a good idea to undertake the medical examination as soon as you make moves to embark on a career as a member of crew. It will then need to be renewed every two years.

Not only can the ENG1 be a prerequisite of any STCW mandatory training course, but it’s also beneficial for you to find out as early as possible if there are any medical reasons that will prevent you from working in the yachting industry, or restrict which roles you can perform aboard.

Doctor taking blood pressure

Where can I get an ENG1 medical exam?

Only MCA-approved doctors can perform an ENG1 medical exam, so it’s not always as straightforward as visiting your local GP. Fortunately there are numerous MCA-approved doctors around the UK that can carry out your ENG1 medical. You can also find a handful of approved doctors in most of the countries you would likely be looking to seek crew work (France, Spain, USA, etc.), giving you greater choice and flexibility.

The maximum fee for an ENG1 medical examination is £80 (approx. €90 or US$110). If you’re employed in the UK, your employer will pay this. If you need extra tests, you may be charged more. This must be agreed with whomever is paying for the ENG1 before you have the tests.

What to take to an ENG1 examination

Once you’ve booked an ENG1 medical examination with a certified doctor you may wonder if you need to take anything with you. The list includes:

  • A form of photo ID (passport, driving licence, official student pass [for new entrants], or a discharge book)
  • Your current ENG1 (if applicable)
  • The name, address and contact details of your GP
  • Any correspondence from your GP, if you’ve recently been to hospital
  • A list of any medication(s) you are taking
  • Your glasses/contact lenses (if you wear them)

What does an ENG1 examination entail?

As nerve-racking as the prospect of a medical examination is, don’t worry. An ENG1 examination is painless, non-invasive and carried out with minimal fuss by a medical professional.

A standard ENG1 examination will include:

  • Measuring your height and weight
  • A standard eye test
  • A colour blindness test
  • A hearing test
  • Ear and throat evaluations
  • Teeth/gums inspection
  • Questions on your medical history, drinking habits, etc.
  • A urine sample (to test kidney functionality and blood sugar)
  • Reflex testing
  • Listening to your heart and lungs, testing blood pressure and heart rate
  • Hernia testing (asking you to cough while gently pressing your abdomen)

The speed of the exam can depend on the doctor and location, but everything should be done and dusted within 30 to 40 minutes. If you pass, you should be issued with your ENG1 certificate straight away so you can be on your way!

Doctor shaking patient's hand

ENG1 results: What if I fail the ENG1 examination?

There are three possible outcomes for the ENG1 seafarer medical examination:

  1. Fit without restrictions (unrestricted)
  2. Fit with restrictions, limiting your work to certain jobs or locations
  3. Temporarily or permanently unfit

You may be awarded a ‘temporarily unfit certificate’ if the doctor has any concerns about your fitness and needs to gain additional medical information from your doctor, or advice from an MCA chief medical advisor.

If you are found ‘permanently unfit’ for the ENG1, this result stands for at least five years. You’ll need to show clinical evidence proving the condition that caused this result has been reversed to be able to progress in your application. You will receive an ENG3 Notice of Failure/Restriction if you’re found unfit or your ENG1 is restricted.

If you want to have an independent medical review, you must contact the MCA Seafarer Health and Safety Branch within one month of the ENG3 being issued. You can find a list of MCA medical referees here

If you’ve failed based on the Ishihara Plate Screening which tests colour vision, you'll be able to undertake the Colour Assessment Diagnosis (CAD) test, which measures the severity and type of colour-vision loss and congenital deficiency, costing between £100 and £150. If this is failed, a restricted ENG1 may be issued. However, deck officers who have failed the Ishihara and CAD tests will be classed as ENG3 Cat 4 ‘Permanently Unfit’.


What next?

Once you've been awarded your certificate, you can proceed with your journey to launch a career as yacht crew!

Here are a few articles you may find helpful in getting on board:

Good luck!

S.O.S Medical Group Ltd