What to consider when designing the ideal yacht galley

Written by Grace Hoskins | With thanks to NautiChef

Last updated: 09/06/2016


Yacht galleys often have limited space, therefore it‘s essential that they’re designed with care and attention to detail and adequate storage.

When designing a galley for both a chartered or private superyacht, the vessel’s type and size should be the main consideration. Private yachts more often than not will not need masses of expensive equipment, but just the necessities.

With help from NautiChef, we have put together some tips on designing the idyllic yacht galley.

Galley and galley equipment on board a superyacht

Designing large or small galley space

For smaller vessels, you need to consider whether that 3rd sink is needed and clever designing is a given in the shape of hidden cupboards, overhead storage and pantry rooms. Of course, in a perfect world, all galleys would be large enough for a small team of chefs to move around one another without the odd elbow nudge or trip hazard, however this is not always possible. But just think, the smaller the galley, the lower the costs and space to fill.

Galley layout

We spoke to a head chef on board a 160m superyacht, who wanted to remain anonymous, he said, “Obviously working on such a large yacht, we have plenty of space for most things. I however, have worked on smaller vessels ranging from 50m up to 160m so am knowledgeable in many scenarios. With regards to layout, I prefer a central cooking island, with work benches and fridges along the walls, but everyone is different. A good wash up area also makes life easier, with a clear directional flow from dirty dishes to clean, with space for draining etc…”

On chartered yachts, with stewards/stewardesses accessing the galley on a regular basis, it is a good idea to design the galley around fast moving traffic; for example, keeping all cooking equipment, preparation areas and the chef’s general space at one end of the room, and an area for collecting food/disposing of food at the other end, to avoid any clashes or unnecessary mishaps.

Catering equipment in a superyacht galleyKnives on the table of a superyachty galley

Storage and equipment

Adequate storage is a given. How many superyachts have countertops filled with clutter and food waste? Fridge freezers, stoves and other appliances can easily be concealed with the help of professional carpenters and designers.

Ideally, galleys would have a day fridge for the essentials as well as decent sized walk-in fridges and freezers.

When it comes to cooking equipment, Carole Prudhomme from Nautichef said, “A chef should always have a good steel frying pan without the non-stick coating to use for meat. These kinds of frying pan can be well heated to grill meat properly. On the other side however, a non-stick pan would be used for fish, vegetables, potatoes, eggs etc…

When choosing a good quality pan, it is important that the base is thick. If you buy a non-stick pan, you should choose a non-stick coating that doesn’t contain Teflon, PFOA or PTFE. An experienced and professional galley/kitchen supplier should sell equipment that doesn’t contain these toxic materials.

Kitchen and galley gadgets

With arms full of delicious, well prepared food, doors can be a hassle. Some yachts may find the addition of foot switches a god send. For a small price, this extra could avoid some major spillages. Alternatively, the slightly more expensive option of automatic doors could again, be beneficial to the vessel.

The anonymous chef added, “For me when it comes to cooking equipment and gadgets, high quality induction stoves, some kind of chargrill and if possible a blast chiller and separate fish fridge with crushed ice machine would be idyllic. Gadgets like Paco Jet, Vita Mix, Sous Vide Circulators and a Vacpac machine would also go down well.”

Furthermore, food and general waste disposal needs to be considered carefully. A rubbish compactor could be used to remove day to day galley waste, or some vessels compact and refrigerate scraps to remove when visiting a marina.

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What to consider when designing the ideal yacht galley

Written by Grace Hoskins | With thanks to NautiChef

Last updated: 09/06/2016


Yacht galleys often have limited space, therefore it‘s essential that they’re designed with care and attention to detail and adequate storage.

When designing a galley for both a chartered or private superyacht, the vessel’s type and size should be the main consideration. Private yachts more often than not will not need masses of expensive equipment, but just the necessities.

With help from NautiChef, we have put together some tips on designing the idyllic yacht galley.

Galley and galley equipment on board a superyacht

Designing large or small galley space

For smaller vessels, you need to consider whether that 3rd sink is needed and clever designing is a given in the shape of hidden cupboards, overhead storage and pantry rooms. Of course, in a perfect world, all galleys would be large enough for a small team of chefs to move around one another without the odd elbow nudge or trip hazard, however this is not always possible. But just think, the smaller the galley, the lower the costs and space to fill.

Galley layout

We spoke to a head chef on board a 160m superyacht, who wanted to remain anonymous, he said, “Obviously working on such a large yacht, we have plenty of space for most things. I however, have worked on smaller vessels ranging from 50m up to 160m so am knowledgeable in many scenarios. With regards to layout, I prefer a central cooking island, with work benches and fridges along the walls, but everyone is different. A good wash up area also makes life easier, with a clear directional flow from dirty dishes to clean, with space for draining etc…”

On chartered yachts, with stewards/stewardesses accessing the galley on a regular basis, it is a good idea to design the galley around fast moving traffic; for example, keeping all cooking equipment, preparation areas and the chef’s general space at one end of the room, and an area for collecting food/disposing of food at the other end, to avoid any clashes or unnecessary mishaps.

Catering equipment in a superyacht galleyKnives on the table of a superyachty galley

Storage and equipment

Adequate storage is a given. How many superyachts have countertops filled with clutter and food waste? Fridge freezers, stoves and other appliances can easily be concealed with the help of professional carpenters and designers.

Ideally, galleys would have a day fridge for the essentials as well as decent sized walk-in fridges and freezers.

When it comes to cooking equipment, Carole Prudhomme from Nautichef said, “A chef should always have a good steel frying pan without the non-stick coating to use for meat. These kinds of frying pan can be well heated to grill meat properly. On the other side however, a non-stick pan would be used for fish, vegetables, potatoes, eggs etc…

When choosing a good quality pan, it is important that the base is thick. If you buy a non-stick pan, you should choose a non-stick coating that doesn’t contain Teflon, PFOA or PTFE. An experienced and professional galley/kitchen supplier should sell equipment that doesn’t contain these toxic materials.

Kitchen and galley gadgets

With arms full of delicious, well prepared food, doors can be a hassle. Some yachts may find the addition of foot switches a god send. For a small price, this extra could avoid some major spillages. Alternatively, the slightly more expensive option of automatic doors could again, be beneficial to the vessel.

The anonymous chef added, “For me when it comes to cooking equipment and gadgets, high quality induction stoves, some kind of chargrill and if possible a blast chiller and separate fish fridge with crushed ice machine would be idyllic. Gadgets like Paco Jet, Vita Mix, Sous Vide Circulators and a Vacpac machine would also go down well.”

Furthermore, food and general waste disposal needs to be considered carefully. A rubbish compactor could be used to remove day to day galley waste, or some vessels compact and refrigerate scraps to remove when visiting a marina.