TOP 10 ENVIRONMENTAL TALKING POINTS OF 2018

It’s been a positive year for the yachting industry with many companies pushing sustainably driven practises. Yachting Pages wraps up the year by bringing to light the top 10 environmental talking points of 2018.

1. Seabin sparks a green wave in UK waters

Australian-based not-for-profit organisation Seabin Project – advocating for cleaner oceans – has developed an innovative product which has captured the interest of many across the yachting industry.

Described by the company as a “floating debris interception device”, a growing number of UK ports are hosting Seabins to combat plastic pollution is UK and European oceans. London’s first Seabin was installed in August.

US-built M/Y Invictus has also become the first ever superyacht to have a Seabin installed on board in a bid to clean up debris nearby while moored at a marina or at anchor.

Yachting Pages is also pleased to have this year announced its new working partnership with Seabin Project.

A Seabin in action removing waste and litter from the water

2. Blue Marine Foundation charity cycle ride from London to Monaco

The 2018 edition of Blue Marine Foundation’s annual charity cycle ride from London to Monaco in September was a success.

Blue Marine Foundation confirmed that £180,000 had been raised, with funds going towards achieving significant conservation gains in Ascension, St Helena, Lyme Bay and the Mediterranean.

3. Eco Angels and Yachting Pages Media Group take action against plastic waste

Family restaurant and sports bar STARS‘N’BARS partnered with Yachting Pages Media Group to pick up plastic waste during and after Monaco Yacht Show 2018.

Kate Powers, co-founder of STARS‘N’BARS, commented after the event, “The response was overwhelmingly positive. Many exhibitors even shared information on their own companies’ waste reduction initiatives.”

4. Solar powered yachts: The way of the future

It’s been an exciting year for new-build shipyards, following a positive development in sustainably powered vessels.

In August of this year, Swiss company SolarImpact Yacht AG debuted the world’s first ocean-going solar superyacht – a project which had been in the research phase for five years.

Australian yard Silent Yachts premiered its 16.7-metre (55-foot) solar-powered catamaran Silent 55 at the Cannes Yachting Festival. She is the first and only oceangoing solar-electric production catamaran in the world.

Construction is also underway on the first hull in Silent Yachts’ new Silent 79 Cruiser series. Spanning 24 metres (79 feet), she will also be completely powered by solar energy.

Side rendering of the solar-powered superyacht

5. EU orders ban of single-use plastics by 2021

In October, the European Parliament voted overwhelmingly for a total ban on most single-use plastics across the EU. The reports developed by the EU found that approximately 150,000 tonnes of plastic are discarded in Europe’s waters every year.

The landmark move, which was backed by MEPs 571-53, will see items such as plastic cups, plates and cutlery, cotton buds, straws, drinks stirrers, balloon sticks and more by 2021.

6. Daedalus Yachts begins construction on zero-emission carbon D80 catamaran

North Carolina shipyard Daedalus Yachts announced in October that it was building a 24-metre (79-foot) sailing catamaran which does not require fossil fuels, and will carry large battery banks along with a hydrogen storage facility on board.

Excess power will be stored in the form of hydrogen, along with power distributed from solar panels on board for an entirely zero emissions practise – all managed by the onboard Deep Blue Hybrid system.

7. Eco-tourism becoming more popular in the yachting industry

Organisations across the world are working hard to create tourism packages which positively benefit the local economy and bring to light environmental issues which needs support.

Rascal Voyages has partnered with Conservation International Indonesia (CI Indonesia for a new scientific expedition series aimed to boost conservation efforts in the region.

Tourists will be given the opportunity to become educated on issues surrounding the environment and to play a part in helping marine preservation.

Asia Pacific Superyachts invited M/Y Latitude to Indonesia during the end of November, where the 52-metre (171-foot) vessel underwent the agency’s ‘Orangutan Viewing Expedition’.

The tour – which took place over three days – exposed the yacht to some of the last remaining jungle in the country, where the orangutans have been forced to relocate following the deforestation of their habitat in the Kalimatan jungles. The yacht agency, aims to raise awareness on their diminishing habitat and bring revenue to the local economy and Indonesian rangers.

Native Indonesian orangutans in the semi-protected area Tanjung Puting National Park

9. Mallorca-based marinas launch new environmental initiative

Marina Port de Mallorca united with Marina Palma Cuarentena to launch an environmental campaign focused on encouraging the industry to better respect the environment.

The two marinas have installed rotating information panels that outline positive environmental practices, along with a complete promotion programme on the marinas’ websites to encourage customers to recycle, avoid water pollution and educate on the dangers of throwing plastics into the sea.

10. The largest ever ocean clean up mission is in progress

Created by Dutch inventor Boyan Slat, a giant ‘Pac Man’ barrier, designed to collect the ocean’s litter and combat plastic pollution, began testing in October off the coast of San Francisco, California.

After six weeks at sea, offshore crew completed its monitoring, data collection and research mission – and have left with further equipment to understand the clean-up system’s behaviour.

On 18th December, testing continued in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch (GPGP) – a vast area the size of Texas full of marine litter – to further understand why it is attracting and concentrating plastic, but not yet retaining it.

Ocean Cleanup vessel

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Top 10 environmental talking points of 2018

Top 10 environmental talking points of 2018 | Yachting Pages
Yachting Pages

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TOP 10 ENVIRONMENTAL TALKING POINTS OF 2018

It’s been a positive year for the yachting industry with many companies pushing sustainably driven practises. Yachting Pages wraps up the year by bringing to light the top 10 environmental talking points of 2018.

1. Seabin sparks a green wave in UK waters

Australian-based not-for-profit organisation Seabin Project – advocating for cleaner oceans – has developed an innovative product which has captured the interest of many across the yachting industry.

Described by the company as a “floating debris interception device”, a growing number of UK ports are hosting Seabins to combat plastic pollution is UK and European oceans. London’s first Seabin was installed in August.

US-built M/Y Invictus has also become the first ever superyacht to have a Seabin installed on board in a bid to clean up debris nearby while moored at a marina or at anchor.

Yachting Pages is also pleased to have this year announced its new working partnership with Seabin Project.

A Seabin in action removing waste and litter from the water

2. Blue Marine Foundation charity cycle ride from London to Monaco

The 2018 edition of Blue Marine Foundation’s annual charity cycle ride from London to Monaco in September was a success.

Blue Marine Foundation confirmed that £180,000 had been raised, with funds going towards achieving significant conservation gains in Ascension, St Helena, Lyme Bay and the Mediterranean.

3. Eco Angels and Yachting Pages Media Group take action against plastic waste

Family restaurant and sports bar STARS‘N’BARS partnered with Yachting Pages Media Group to pick up plastic waste during and after Monaco Yacht Show 2018.

Kate Powers, co-founder of STARS‘N’BARS, commented after the event, “The response was overwhelmingly positive. Many exhibitors even shared information on their own companies’ waste reduction initiatives.”

4. Solar powered yachts: The way of the future

It’s been an exciting year for new-build shipyards, following a positive development in sustainably powered vessels.

In August of this year, Swiss company SolarImpact Yacht AG debuted the world’s first ocean-going solar superyacht – a project which had been in the research phase for five years.

Australian yard Silent Yachts premiered its 16.7-metre (55-foot) solar-powered catamaran Silent 55 at the Cannes Yachting Festival. She is the first and only oceangoing solar-electric production catamaran in the world.

Construction is also underway on the first hull in Silent Yachts’ new Silent 79 Cruiser series. Spanning 24 metres (79 feet), she will also be completely powered by solar energy.

Side rendering of the solar-powered superyacht

5. EU orders ban of single-use plastics by 2021

In October, the European Parliament voted overwhelmingly for a total ban on most single-use plastics across the EU. The reports developed by the EU found that approximately 150,000 tonnes of plastic are discarded in Europe’s waters every year.

The landmark move, which was backed by MEPs 571-53, will see items such as plastic cups, plates and cutlery, cotton buds, straws, drinks stirrers, balloon sticks and more by 2021.

6. Daedalus Yachts begins construction on zero-emission carbon D80 catamaran

North Carolina shipyard Daedalus Yachts announced in October that it was building a 24-metre (79-foot) sailing catamaran which does not require fossil fuels, and will carry large battery banks along with a hydrogen storage facility on board.

Excess power will be stored in the form of hydrogen, along with power distributed from solar panels on board for an entirely zero emissions practise – all managed by the onboard Deep Blue Hybrid system.

7. Eco-tourism becoming more popular in the yachting industry

Organisations across the world are working hard to create tourism packages which positively benefit the local economy and bring to light environmental issues which needs support.

Rascal Voyages has partnered with Conservation International Indonesia (CI Indonesia for a new scientific expedition series aimed to boost conservation efforts in the region.

Tourists will be given the opportunity to become educated on issues surrounding the environment and to play a part in helping marine preservation.

Asia Pacific Superyachts invited M/Y Latitude to Indonesia during the end of November, where the 52-metre (171-foot) vessel underwent the agency’s ‘Orangutan Viewing Expedition’.

The tour – which took place over three days – exposed the yacht to some of the last remaining jungle in the country, where the orangutans have been forced to relocate following the deforestation of their habitat in the Kalimatan jungles. The yacht agency, aims to raise awareness on their diminishing habitat and bring revenue to the local economy and Indonesian rangers.

Native Indonesian orangutans in the semi-protected area Tanjung Puting National Park

9. Mallorca-based marinas launch new environmental initiative

Marina Port de Mallorca united with Marina Palma Cuarentena to launch an environmental campaign focused on encouraging the industry to better respect the environment.

The two marinas have installed rotating information panels that outline positive environmental practices, along with a complete promotion programme on the marinas’ websites to encourage customers to recycle, avoid water pollution and educate on the dangers of throwing plastics into the sea.

10. The largest ever ocean clean up mission is in progress

Created by Dutch inventor Boyan Slat, a giant ‘Pac Man’ barrier, designed to collect the ocean’s litter and combat plastic pollution, began testing in October off the coast of San Francisco, California.

After six weeks at sea, offshore crew completed its monitoring, data collection and research mission – and have left with further equipment to understand the clean-up system’s behaviour.

On 18th December, testing continued in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch (GPGP) – a vast area the size of Texas full of marine litter – to further understand why it is attracting and concentrating plastic, but not yet retaining it.

Ocean Cleanup vessel

Sign up to our newsletter to get the best of Yachting Pages delivered direct to your inbox every month, and follow us on Facebook and Twitter to join the conversation.